Instructores

Dr. Dante Travisany
Dr. Dante Travisany

Dr. Dante Travisany

Centro de Modelamiento Matemático (CMM), Universidad de Chile y Universidad de Las Américas (UDLA), Chile

I am a Bioinformatics Engineer from the University of Talca and a Ph.D. in Complex Systems Engineering from the Adolfo Ibañez University. Now I’m Academic Researcher and Professor at Universidad de las Américas (CL). I have participated in several projects, from the reconstruction of the genomes and communities of extremophilic microorganisms isolated from a copper mine in northern Chile associated with copper bioleaching processes. The genomes and transcriptomes of fruit trees, such as sultanina grapes, raspberries, and cherries. Up to the complete genome sequencing of Mapuche-Huilliche, which has served to understand the Amerindian component of the Chilean population. For the first time, I also managed to fully assemble the pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis, a genome that was once difficult to assemble due to its large number of repeats. This pathogen is one of the leading causes of salmon diseases in Chilean fish farms and reports millions of USD losses in this industry. The knowledge of its genome is used to design strategies to mitigate the salmonid rickettsial syndrome.

Since the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic began, I have been part of the CoV-2 Genomes Consortium, which has generated a strong push in sequencing, analyzing, and establishing genomic surveillance for the coronavirus. I have been researching and working on the correct way to process, analyze, identify variants and visualize the data of Chilean and international SARS-CoV-2 genomes, and I have coordinated the generation of the apps and databases of the Genomes Consortium page CoV-2 www.cov2.cl.

In association with the Center for Mathematical Modeling, the CEODOS program, and the Tara Océan foundation, we are trying to understand and model the intra-species, inter-species, and environmental interactions of different communities of microorganisms such as marine plankton. This community, composed of marine microorganisms that float in the water and that are the primary source of food for oceanic organisms, is critical in mitigating climate change by absorbing approximately 25% of CO2 emitted by humans. In other words, plankton is associated with essential ecosystem services that the ocean provides us, such as the provision of food, climate regulation, recreation, generation of knowledge, among others.
Working to understand the base of the food pyramid of their communities is essential to maintain these services. The study of the ocean is crucial, the UN has proclaimed this decade (2021-2030) as the decade of science for the sustainable development of the ocean.